Politics & Economics

Algeria Rejects Any Foreign Intervention in Libya

North Africa

Algerian authorities have informed head of Libya’s Government of National Accord (GNA), Fayez al-Sarraj, of their strong rejection to any foreign intervention in Libya, Algerian diplomatic sources said.

Algerian authorities have informed head of Libya’s Government of National Accord (GNA), Fayez al-Sarraj, of their strong rejection to any foreign intervention in Libya, Algerian diplomatic sources said.

Sarraj had arrived in Algeria on Monday where he held talks with its newly-elected President Abdelmadjid Tebboune. He was accompanied by the GNA foreign minister Mohammed Taha Siala and interior minister Fathi Bashagha.

A statement from the Algerian presidency said that Tebboune had received Sarraj for talks, but did not disclose further details.

The sources said the president had informed his guest that Algeria rejects the eruption of a war on its borders.

Algiers was prepared to play a role in resolving the Libyan crisis, Tebboune told Sarraj, according to the sources. It encourages internal parties to resolve their disputes among themselves without any foreign intervention.

The Algerian news agency said the meeting between Tebboune and Sarraj was part of regular talks between the neighboring countries.

Separately, Tebboune received an invitation from German Chancellor Angela Merkel to attend the international conference on Libya scheduled for Berlin at the end of the month.

The presidency said Tebboune and Merkel discussed Libya during a telephone call, emphasizing the need to reach a political solution to its crisis and end foreign meddling in the country.

Algeria has been one of the countries most affected by the crisis, which erupted with the overthrow of Moammar al-Gaddafi’s regime in 2011. Authorities have seized hundreds of weapons smuggled across the border from Libya in recent years and arrested several extremists that were heading to and from the conflict-ridden country.

Tensions have been high after Turkey’s parliament authorized last week the deployment of troops to Libya, following a deal with the GNA on sending military experts and weapons signed into law in December.

The GNA and Turkey signed security and maritime agreements in November last year, angering Mediterranean countries including Greece and Cyprus who also seek to exploit energy resources in the region.

The deals have alarmed Mediterranean and Arab countries and the United Nations, which have slammed Ankara’s meddling in Libya and warned that its intervention may escalate the situation in the already unstable country.

Image: AFP

Article: Al Bawaba